Books to Prepare for the High Holy Days

Image: Man blowing a shofar. Photo by jonathunder via wikimedia. Some rights reserved.

Do you hear the sound of that distant horn?

The High Holy Days are on their way sooner than we realize. This year they begin with Rosh Hashanah at sundown on October 2, 2016. Yom Kippur will begin at sundown on October 11.

In other words, school begins in the Northern Hemisphere and then “bam!” it will be time to welcome 5777.

Are you reading anything to prepare for the season this year? Doing anything else to prepare?

Here are some books I’ve found useful for High Holy Days preparation. Don’t try to read them all! Spending quality time with one good book can be an excellent help.

The official start date for preparation is the first of Elul. This year (2016) that will fall on Friday, Sept 2 at sundown. I’m publishing this list now so that you can have a bit of lead time to visit your local Jewish bookshop!

Shabbat Shalom! – Va’etchanan

Parashat Va’etchanan always falls on the Shabbat following Tisha B’Av. It includes the passage Deuteronomy 4:25-40, which contains a prediction that the people of Israel would sin and be forced to leave the Land. That part of the portion is like the last hot breeze blowing from the coals of Tisha B’Av.

Fortunately this is also Shabbat Nachamu, the first of three sabbaths of consolation. The Haftarah for this week is Isaiah 40:1-26 which begins:

Comfort, comfort My people, says your God.
Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and declare to her
That her term of service is over,
That her iniquity is expiated;
For she has received at the hand of the LORD
Double for all her sins. – Isaiah 40:1-2

A midrash raises an interesting question about the grammar in the opening line. “Comfort” here is a command and it is plural.

Is God comforting Israel? If so, why is the command “Comfort” plural? And why is “comfort” repeated twice as a command? Or is Israel here commanded to comfort God, who was also traumatized by exile? Are we all supposed to comfort each other?

Who is commanded to comfort whom?

The word “comfort” gives us the name for this special Shabbat, “Nachamu.”

More thoughts on the Torah portion:

Ambassador-at-Large by Rabbi Amy Sheinerman

Shabbat Nachamu by Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild

Image by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat (Poem, with audio)

Praying the Sh’ma by Rabbi Ruth Adar

The Life You Save by Rabbi David Kasher

Doubling Down on Justice

This past August 5, the Movement for Black Lives published a 47,000 word platform that has hit a nerve in the American Jewish community. Most of the furor has focussed on a single hot-button word in the document: genocide. The rest of the attention has gone to a call for support of BDS, divestment from all things Israeli.

I have been quiet while I read and studied the document itself and read reactions from Jews whose opinions I respect. 

Today Rabbi Sharon Brous of IKAR in Los Angeles published an article in the Jewish Journal that says what I’d like to say, only much better than I could ever say it. So instead of blathering here I will post a link to it for you.

The Jewish Holiday of Love

Image: Israeli Folk Dancing. Photo via Israeli PikiWiki, some rights reserved.

Tu B’Av is a minor but fun Jewish holiday. After the mourning of Tisha B’Av, this is a lovely little day to be happy and to celebrate love.  Today in Israel, it’s called Chag HaAhavah, the Holiday of Love, and it’s a favored day for weddings. Think of it as Jewish Valentine’s Day.

  • Tu B’Av = Fifteenth of the Month of Av. In Hebrew, the letters that form the number 15 can also be pronounced “Tu.”
  • In Temple times, in Jerusalem, the grape harvest began on the fifteenth of Av and ended on the tenth of Tishrei, Yom Kippur. On both those days, single girls dressed in white and went to dance in the vineyards in the afternoon. It was a traditional time for courtship.
  • There are no big religious observances for the day. However, it’s a good day to get married, a good day to fall in love, and a great day to tell your loved ones “I love you.”

In 2016, Tu B’Av falls on August 18-19 (begins at sundown, runs until sundown.) For future years, check the online Hebrew calendar.

Anti-anxiety Shabbat – coping during these difficult days — Rabbi John Rosove’s Blog

Image: Sunset from my back porch. Photo by Rabbi Ruth Adar.

I love this post from Rabbi John Rosove. If you have been feeling anxious and are wondering how to cope, give it a read:

No one should be surprised that so many Americans feel anxious these days. Consider all that’s happened in the last 16 years, the cumulative effect of which has led to the state of our national psyche today: The contested 2000 Presidential election – the rise of Al Qaeda, international terrorism and 9/11 – the Afghan […]

via Anti-anxiety Shabbat – coping during these difficult days — Rabbi John Rosove’s Blog

Hack On, Hack Off

Image: A Broken Lock. Photo by Rohit Sharma, via pixabay.

Back when the world was young and I was a college student, the slang that young men used for angry was “hacked off.” Girls didn’t use it, but I remember guys saying, “I’m so hacked off about….” whatever it was annoying them. The phrase always comes back to me when someone says, “I’ve been hacked.” Now I’m the hackee.

‘Way back in 2012, someone who didn’t like my comments on You Don’t Mess with the Zohan deciphered my password and used it to mess up one of my blogs.  I wrote about it in You Don’t Mess With the Laughter.

Well, it happened again. This time someone didn’t like a post about the term “Old Testament.” They logged onto my account and got rid of that post.

I’ve repaired the damage, reposted the article, and gotten password generation software, so that I can have strong passwords without having to remember them. If you readers care about your data, I encourage you to do the same.

But I am still worried about the person who felt so strongly about that post that they went to all the trouble of prying open my account to get rid of it. That person was hurting, I assume, or they wouldn’t have done that.

To anyone unhappy with a post on this blog:

Please leave me a question in the comments, or tell me that I have offended you. Leave something like this and I promise you will receive a civil answer from me. It may not be the answer you want but it will take into account your feelings.

Rabbi Adar, your post The Jewish Bible ≠ The Old Testament was offensive to me. It was disrespectful of Christianity in the following ways: (1) (2) and (3). Please reconsider your offensive words.

Keep in mind that if you write something with name-calling I will delete that; company policy. So this will not be allowed to stay on the board:

Rabbi Adar, you idiot, you commie pinko lesbo socialist…. blah blah blah….

Write that, and I will delete your message. However, you can rest assured that if anyone calls you an idiot, or any of those other names, or a fascist, or a toadcushion, I will delete their message with equal speed and enthusiasm.

Sigh.

 

 

Tales from the Fast

Image: The word pictured is Eicha,the name of the Book of Lamentations. Artwork by Rabbi Ruth Adar.

Perhaps you fasted. Perhaps you chose not to fast.

But if you are a regular reader of this blog, you know that the annual observance of Tisha B’Av ran from sundown Saturday to sundown Sunday, August 13-14, 2016. (We couldn’t fast the day before, because it was Shabbat.)

How was the day for you? What did you do or not do? I’m writing this before the fast and uploading it automatically, so I cannot yet tell you how it went for me but I can tell you my plan. I will leave a comment after sunset at my home to let you know how it went for me.

My plan: I cannot fast from food this year, due to some health problems. Therefore I will eat and drink what is needed for health. I will fast from social media.

I will listen to the Scroll of Lamentations via a recording, because I can’t go to shul (again, a health issue.)

I will study the scroll tonight.

And now the light is fading, and social media is part of my fast, so I must go.

Tzom kal! That means, I wish you an easy fast. I also wish you insight and reflection – I hope that you will share some of those in the comments!