Shabbat Shalom! – Naso

This week’s Torah portion, Naso, describes the curious vow of the Nazirites, a solemn promise to eschew haircuts, wine, and contamination by a corpse. It also explains the procedure for release from that vow. It deals with the trial of the Sotah, the woman suspected of adultery. The portion concludes with one of the most famous texts in Numbers, the Priestly Blessing.

Here are some divrei Torah on Parashat Naso:

With Gratitude for Converts by Rabbi Janet Marder

Community Camping by Rabbi Amy Scheinerman

The Strange Ordeal of Bitter Water by Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild

Rituals, Spiritual Fidelity, and Turning Towards God by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

Judaism and the Blessing of Love by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

The Nazirite Puzzle by Rabbi Ruth Adar

Naso Sermon by Rabbi Steven Moskovitz

 

Women’s Hair: Why Cover It?

9647972522_eb1f0c3ca7_zA reader recently asked: “What is the background for women covering their heads during services? Is it optional in most US conservative and reform synagogues now?”

Head coverings for women are mentioned in the Torah in chapter 5 of Numbers, in something called the Sotah ritual. The Sotah was a woman suspected of adultery, and the ritual was a test. Part of that involved uncovering her hair, so the rabbis deduced from those verses that there was a biblical commandment for married women to cover their hair. Elsewhere in Tanach, in Song of Songs, there is the suggestion that the sight of women’s hair is erotic, from which the rabbis determined that hatless women would be distracting to a man at prayer.

The specifics of hair covering (how much cover, and when) was a matter of communal custom in ancient times, and it remains so today.

Today in Reform and Conservative synagogues women are welcome to cover their heads for prayer if they wish to do so; in some congregations, it is a requirement. Usually if there is a rule about it, it will be posted outside the sanctuary, and coverings of some sort will be available. In a Reform or Conservative shul, the kippah or yarmulke has become a common sight on men or women. These days it is not a modesty issue, but a matter of respect for the activity of prayer and the awareness of the Divine. 

Personally, putting on a head covering is part of my routine for prayer and study. It’s a way of telling my body, “OK, time to get serious now!”

There is a wider variety of practice among Orthodox congregations. There, a kippah may be seen as a men’s garment, and therefore is not worn by women. The lace hats you described in your original question are a feminized version of the kippah. Women may wear a tichel (head scarf, pictured above) or a regular hat, or in some communities they may cover their own hair with a sheitel (wig.) If you visit an Orthodox synagogue for services, wear a scarf; that will usually be sufficient for guests. 

For a wonderful article on the subject, read “Hair Coverings for Married Women” by Alieza Salzberg.