A Word to Readers in France

I am sick to hear of the terrible violence in Paris. As Shabbat falls here in California, know that you and all France are in my prayers tonight. You will be in our thoughts as we sit at the Shabbos table.

May all who suffer be comforted, and may peace soon be restored in your beautiful country.

Kosher Food

One of my favorite blogs is Rachel Mankowitz’s The Cricket Pages. She just published a post about her memories around kosher food, which I share with my readers. Enjoy.

rachelmankowitz

When I was nine or ten years old, not long after my family started to keep kosher, we went to a hotel up in the Catskills for Presidents’ weekend. It was a skiing resort, basically, and it was kosher. I’ve worked hard to block out the skiing portion of the trip because it was truly harrowing, but there was also an outdoor ice skating rink, and an indoor pool, and a theatre where the last gasp of the Borscht Belt came to perform. But most of all, there was the food. They made fake scallops from halibut, cut into rounds, and whenever they were on the menu, that’s what I ate. The waiters were convinced I was lying about my age, because I could have had a hamburger and French fries, or spaghetti and meatballs and I chose this?

But I’d grown up on seafood, at my best friend’s house…

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A Note to Readers

I am down with one of my periodic bouts of sciatica. Sometimes it gets out of control. During those times, the worst thing I can do is sit at my computer.

I have a number of things I want to do and cannot right now. The first is to get back to you about the class I proposed. Another is to answer some questions too involved for me to address via my phone from an exercise mat on the floor. The last is new posts.

I am catching up on my reading, and if I find goodies to share I will do so.

I hope to be back after Shabbat. Don’t worry about me; this is a nuisance, not a tragedy.

I wish you all Shabbat Shalom!

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Leonard Nimoy – “You and I” – A Poem for Elul and All Times

Rabbi John Rosove’s blog is well worth reading on a regular basis. This particular entry, with a poem by Leonard Nimoy z”l, is particularly appropriate for Elul.

Rabbi John Rosove's Blog

It’s been six months since we lost Leonard, and his family misses him dearly, his gentleness and intelligence, his profound interest and concern about the world, his very large heart, curiosity, and penetrating mind, his simple loving presence.

This poem of Leonard’s below came to me from a friend. I had not seen it before which points to one of Leonard’s virtues – his modesty and humility. Though he knew what were his strengths and gifts, he didn’t talk about himself that way. He spoke rather about ideas, the creative process, the arts, world events, politics, and his family.

Leonard’s poem is part of a longer work that he published in 1973 that included a blend of poetry with black and white photography.

Given the poem’s theme, it is particularly appropriate for us to read now, during this season of Elul, the Hebrew month preceding the High Holidays. I post…

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Why We Love “Once-a-Year” Jews

This conversation is so wonderful, I can’t wait to share it via my own blog.

downtowndvar

In this blog dialogue, Rabbis Elyse Goldstein of City Shul and Ed Elkin of the First Narayever Congregation, friends and colleagues in downtown Toronto, converse on matters of contemporary Jewish import. We publish everytime the spirit moves us, or when you send us a hot-button question. Readers are welcome to submit suggestions for future topics in the comments below.

Elyse Goldstein holding Torah mantle

Hi Ed,

Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services. I imagine how it feels to shul regulars: a fashion-show of strangers, preening, talking, walking in and out, coming late, leaving early. It’s a bad theatre scene— with people exiting before or even during the final act. It’s a concert gone wrong— with fans singing their hearts out while the others don’t know the songs, weren’t there when the band first formed, and don’t understand the lyrics. 

And I also imagine how it feels to those who come only for those days: they’ve…

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