King Bibi is Dead! Long Live King Bibi! (Or: why the winner will lose and the loser will win; a short primer on the upcoming Israeli election)

rabbiadar:

Reblogged on CoffeeShopRabbi.com…

Whether you agree politically with this writer or not, he does an excellent job of explaining the complexities of Israeli politics in general and this election in particular. It’s well worth your time: enjoy!

Originally posted on Unpublished In Tel-Aviv :

0-BIBI copy

This coming Tuesday, Israel will vote and once the votes are counted, Isaac “Bougie” Herzog will ‘win’ the election, and Bibi Netanyahu will ‘lose’. And yet Bibi will be the next Prime Minister.

Shenkin, Tel-Aviv: "It's Us Or The Left/Only The Likud/Only Netanyahu" Shenkin, Tel-Aviv: “It’s Us Or The Left/Only The Likud/Only Netanyahu”

It isn’t an exaggeration to state that Bibi Netanyahu is the most hated man in the country right now. Posters everywhere (except those paid for by his party) vilify him by name and in no uncertain terms. An entire movement (Victory 2015) has sprung up with the sole purpose of toppling him. Everybody, of all political stripes, has a reason: the economic destruction of the Israeli middle class; the go-nowhere war with Gaza that ended in… well, nobody knows exactly; his calculated humiliation of Israel’s largest, most faithful and strongest ally; the secret funding of the settlements; the demonisation of the Israeli left; the attacks on the…

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The Blog’s New Clothes

We’re reading Parashat Tetzaveh this week, known to a friend of mine as the “Fashion Parashah.” In it we learn all about the priestly vestments that Aaron and his sons will wear.

My blog has been wearing the same outfit since 2010, through 618 posts. I woke up today and decided it was time for a new look. I’m still not sure how I feel about it, but it is clean and readable and I think it will be friendlier for folks reading via tablet and smartphone. If anything about it is acutely uncomfortable for you, let me know. WordPress is a powerful platform, and I have options.

 

 

If This Enrages You – Do Something About It

rabbiadar:

I hope my readers will read this and join me in signing this petition.

Originally posted on Rabbi John Rosove's Blog:

I have printed Anat Hoffman’s most recent letter in the Israeli Religious Action Center’s weekly email “The Pluralist” because, if you are like me, this will enrage you and inspire you to do something. If so, then please sign the IRAC’s Petition and send this blog to your friends asking them to do the same.

Sign Our Petition to the Interior Ministry

Dear Friends,

Israel is planning to deport two of its own citizens. Two children, David (14) and Michal (8).  Their crime?  Their Israeli father died before their non-Jewish mother was naturalized as an Israeli citizen.

Their father, Gershon, spent several years working as an Israeli emissary in Uzbekistan, where he met and fell in love with Valentina. Their first-born son was named David, after Gershon’s father, a Holocaust survivor.

They moved back to Israel and lived near Gershon’s large extended family. Gershon filed the necessary paperwork for Valentina…

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Havdalah as a Light to the Community

rabbiadar:

As beautiful a study as I’ve ever seen of Havdalah! I am reposting it on Coffee Shop Rabbi as a vision of what’s possible.

Originally posted on Hardcore Mesorah:

Reflections and Lessons from the Havdalah Circle of Boyle Heights

Dare to make anyplace a sacred space! Havdalah at the 6th Street Bridge, overlooking the city. Dare to make anyplace a sacred space! Punk rock Havdalah with Shmueli Gonzales and Jesse Elliott. Los Angeles.

As Shabbat comes to an end, I always make my way back towards the town and people I love. Towards the arches which over the years have become know as my station and post. And leaning against the metal arches of the bridge, high upon the Los Angeles Sixth Street Viaduct, I bask in the final and lingering rays of the Sabbath’s sun. And then I wait. Wait for the sun to set. I wait, for my buddies to count the stars and declare that it’s time. “One… two… three stars… it’s time!”

And then out from my ubiquitous bag I take these items. A Hebrew prayerbook, a dried etrog and clove…

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Most Read Posts of 2014

This has been a very active year for this blog. Activity here as more than doubled since last year, and I thank you for your readership.

These are the ten most frequently read posts on this blog among the posts I wrote this year:

How to Succeed at Congregational Life: Ten Tips

What to Wear to a Jewish Funeral

What to Wear to Synagogue?

Blogging While Black: Yeah, It’s a Thing

Conversion Manifesto

Prayer for the Opening of Baseball Season

“Blood Moons” and the Meaning of Prophecy

A More Meaningful Chanukah

Never Say This when You Welcome a Visitor!

Thinking of Conversion to Judaism? 5 Things to Do

The five most read posts of all time (well, the five calendar years this blog has been online):

Bar and Bat Mitzvah Etiquette for Beginners

10 Tips for Attending a Jewish Funeral

What’s “Yasher Koach?”

Choosing Synagogue Membership

How to Succeed at Congregational Life: Ten Tips

Rabbi and Dog
The Blogger and her Helper

The goal of this blog has been basic information for newcomers and others who may feel awkward in Jewish community. There’s a tremendous amount of information available in books and on the internet, but sometimes it’s too much all at once. I hope that by offering topics in small bites they have been more manageable.

Mixed in with those “basic info” articles are posts about growing Jewish identity and about living a meaningful Jewish life. I am not interested in Judaism as an exercise in historical reinactment. The prospect of Judaism that gives meaning and purpose to real 21st century lives is much more exciting to me.

So here are my questions for you: Which posts have been most helpful or interesting to you? What would you like to read about in 2015? Is there a topic about which you’ve heard “enough already!?”

I wish you a happy secular New Year of growth and bloom!

Exodus: Gods and Kings

Originally posted on Rabbi at the Movies:

ExodusRidley Scott’s Exodus: Gods and Kings is yet another Hollywood take on the Exodus story. Previous movie tellings include The Ten Commandments (1923), Moses the Lawgiver (1974), The Prince of Egypt (1998), The Ten Commandments (2007), and the most famous movie by that name, The Ten Commandments (1956) with Charlton Heston. Exodus: Gods and Kings has received mixed and negative reviews from critics.

It’s a boring movie with spectacular special effects. I am not sure what more to say than that – if you don’t know the story, go read the Book of Exodus.

Commentary

If you have read Exodus, you know that this film departs from the Torah in some significant ways.  Unlike The Prince of Egypt or the 1956 version of The Ten Commandments, the writers did not seek their extra material in Jewish midrashic literature. This film focuses on an imagining of the relationship of Moses and Ramses II…

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